Good advice


I’ve been struggling with accepting some of my ancestors.  I’ve been very very angry since I discovered their existence.  They were, in fact, stereotypically evil in today’s standards.  They also benefitted GREATLY from their evil.  Like as in stupid rich.  And when one branch of the family broke off from them, the branch I descend from, the money went *poof* because living a life of hard ethical work is much more difficult.

This is good advice.  I wouldn’t be here without them.

via Ancestor Wisdom – QOTD

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Practical Civil Disobedience For Beginners


This. If every one of us did only one of these things it would tip the tide. Yes I am in America but it applies equally to our particular businesses and government officials as well.

Writer Goes Roaming

The state doesn’t work within the law – ultimately, it works within the laws which we allow. Those laws must be sensible and ethical. Think about it: if the government decreed that we must all walk backward, we would disobey, because it makes no sense. And if they ordered us to kill our sick loved ones to save the NHS money, we would refuse because it is unethical.

We are under no obligation to do what is nonsensical and wrong. In fact, our moral obligation is to remove a government which orders us to do such things. The greatest atrocities in human history occur when people ignore their moral obligation to differentiate between civic duty, and blind submission.

We currently live in a country where our democratic decisions are refused, our rights of free speech are overturned, our territory and culture is being given away to people whose mission is…

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Random thoughts


Odin and Loki are two sides of the same coin.

You can choose the path of pain, and growth, by choosing the path of Odin.

Or.

You can have it forced upon you, without being able to have any control in the process, by choosing to remain stagnant.  And by doing so, offering yourself to Loki.

Either way, there is pain.  And growth.  But in one you are an active participant.  And in one you are the victim.

Choose wisely.

Let the weeping and gnashing of teeth begin!


List of banned words at CDC

Given the fact that the CDC isn’t a government agency, it’s funded in large part by the pharmaceutical companies, and the fact that the science is corrupted by the fact that the pharmaceutical companies pay for the research, I don’t have a problem with this. When the pharmaceutical companies get out of the research business, and when the revolving door between the CDC and the pharmaceutical companies gets permanently shut, I’ll believe what they publish. I realized about half way through my bachelor’s program that if I wanted to know the results of a study all I had to do was look at who funded it.

When the CDC is sets the guidelines for the vaccination schedule – and states use the vaccination schedule to make not only policy, but law – and the CDC makes money from every vaccine sold, there is a captive market of tens of millions of people that are at risk. The pharmaceutical companies have ZERO liability for the safety of their product in this particular case. How is that evidence based? Show me the double blind studies? You can’t. Because there aren’t any.

It’s the same for pharmaceuticals. LDL for instance has NEVER. EVER. Been shown to have any link with heart attack or stroke risk. NONE. People with high LDL, people with low LDL, and people with normal LDL all have heart attacks at about the same rate, as far as I can tell.  Yet statins are pushed on everyone with an LDL over 100. Why? Why would you push a drug on someone that’s been shown, over time, to raise your risk for type II diabetes? for dementia? For sexual problems? For osteoporosis? Because pharmaceutical companies make a lot of money from statins. And because they fund their own research. And they fund the CDC. And they make the guidelines.

Triglycerides have a LOT to do with heart disease risk. And stroke risk. And type II diabetes risk. But if they treat triglycerides at all (which BTW are best treated with diet and lifestyle, not drugs) – if they even had drugs for that which they don’t, not really – they would lose out on drug sales for that same diabetes. Why would you treat triglycerides when you can treat something that doesn’t have any effect on the problem and in 5 years that same patient will now have two diseases you can sell them drugs for?

No, I’m totally good with this. When pharmaceutical companies quit funding nursing schools, medical schools, the agencies that make the guidelines (which aren’t voluntary at all, I might add) and quit gaming the system in their favor, I think we can go back to discussing evidence based.

Knitting fails.


Sometimes I just think maybe I should give up on a pattern.  Or a project.  I’ve knit

this pattern  several times and it’s turned out really well each time.  Until now.  I currently have one, nearly finished, on my needles.  It’s the third time I had to start this particular sweater – first I dropped some stitches.  Then my husband pulled it off the needles when he laid down on the couch and didn’t realize it was there (it was under a blanket so the cat wouldn’t attack it).   Now I’m going to have to rip it back to the underarms.

Somehow I missed the ribbing for the neck.  Which has to be done as an integral part of the sweater, you really can’t pick up and knit it after the fact.

This is throwing a SERIOUS wrench into my holiday knitting schedule.

 

Anxiety. A PSA.


Look. We all have anxiety, or the great majority of us do. Our society is a 24 hour society now, if you’re salaried your boss likely expects you to complete work however it must be done. If that means taking it home and working until midnight, then that’s what we are expected to do. If it means we are on call, that’s what we do. If it means we don’t take vacation because we might get overlooked for a promotion – or worse, laid off – if we do, then we work endlessly.

Some of us don’t call out even when we should, even when we’re potentially infecting others that can’t protect themselves from our illness. We can’t afford to.

We look around at our homes, which are not as clean as some of us would like, but we’re too tired in the time we have at home to do anything about it. We look at our neglected yards, and realize the same. If we even have a yard to worry about. Some of us are working 2 and 3 part time jobs and barely breaking even – because we can’t find a full time job.

We’re exhausted. We don’t exercise enough, or sometimes at all, because our jobs wear us out and we don’t get enough sleep, because we don’t exercise. It’s an endless feedback loop. Some of us awaken at night with anxiety about what the future might bring, even though we’re exhausted. We spend all too many hours on the computer – as a hiding place to avoid these issues – which causes disruptions in melantonin production and interferes with sleep. We stay up too late and we get up too early, always fatigued and wishing for just one more hour of sleep. We say yes to people when we should be saying no, because we worry about the future monetary situation if we don’t.

I’ve given all the reasons we have anxiety, but it doesn’t do any good to name the problem unless I offer solutions. So here are a few.

Turn the computer or your phone OFF. OFF. Like, totally. Set a time after which you will turn it off, unless you are on call, and realize that the world will go on without you for a time. If you give in and turn it back on, use the time it’s booting to think about whether you really want to get sucked into that morass again. If the answer is no, or you’re not sure, then don’t do it. There will always be tomorrow to get involved in that three ring circus again. Respect yourself enough now to turn it off.

Go for a walk if you can – if your neighborhood is too dangerous, then don’t do it there. Getting fresh air and being around trees and other plants is anxiety reducing. Go to a park if it’s safe, find some place you can safely enjoy a little nature. Even if that’s by walking in the landscaped area of an industrial park.

Dig a hole if you can. Then fill it back in. Or plant something, even better. Seeds are cheap and sometimes people will give them away. There are seed exchange websites and some libraries for seeds. Use your time on the computer to look for a few. Touching dirt actually causes markedly reduced stress and an increase in happiness because the natural soil bacteria and fungi secrete substances that are calming to the brain in that way. We absorb them through our skin, we breathe them in when we turn over the soil, and we help ourselves work through anxiety in this way. The physical exertion of digging a hole will use up all that excess energy that anxiety generates, giving it a physical outlet and dissipating it.

Time, there’s never enough time, right? Well there’s always time for the things we MAKE time for. Volunteer somewhere. Maybe a shelter, a nursing home, the food bank, the library, a hospital, even a church if you are so inclined, or an alternative spiritual center if you are not. Many places have a need for volunteer staff that goes chronically unfulfilled. Giving your time, even an hour a month, away to someone who needs it more than you do is anxiety reducing. Why? Because selflessness reduces anxiety. Giving of ourselves makes us happier. Human interaction – real human interaction, not FB interaction – reduces stress and increases happiness.

Read a book. No, it’s not like a kindle and it’s a little bulkier and harder to carry around, but the mind engages with an actual book in entirely different ways than it does when you are reading off a computer screen. This has been documented in studies. The physicality of an actual book can ground you and help reduce anxiety. You can rub the spine, you turn pages, the scent of the paper and the ink sometimes can be smelled. These are all physical cues that reduce anxiety. If it’s a good novel, you can be carried away to the land in the story and this prevents anxiety from even developing. When you return to the land of reality, you have a vicarious experience that you can retreat to in times of stress and use as an anchor point.

These are only a few things. Not everyone will be able to do them all, most people will be able to do one or two. Even people who are living on welfare and food stamps will be able to do at least some of these. Try one. You might find that not only have you reduced anxiety, you’ve increased happiness and created a better life for yourself.

Smudging – Alpine Style


Fascinating.

The Weekly Druid

Raeucher-Pfanndl My Räucher-Pfanndl with a selfmade and a bought smudge stick

Smudging is, by now, a ritual that is widely practiced in the Pagan community. What I mostly observe when invited to pagan group ceremonies, though, is the use of Prairie Sage bundled into smudge sticks, a way of smudging as we see some Native Americans doing it.

Sage smudge sticks are a great tool in many ways (easy to carry around with you, easy to light, to hold in your hand etc. etc.) and considering which plant is being used and what it is associated with, it makes so much sense. But as always in my spiritual practice, I ask myself: is there something my ancestors did, or folks still do, that is more connected to me and my own homeland?

So, what I would like to do today is explore a different smudging practice. Please see that as my personal…

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Bad research


You’re going to quote Salon as a serious source? Because that’s not a research article, that’s an opinion piece. And the “research” they link to is a link to Artist International, which is not a research foundation. Another opinion piece.  Shoddy research, shoddy methods, shoddy results – why am I not surprised?  And I’m absolutely certain who ever writes the blog at “Facing the fires within”  has absolutely no understanding of research methods – let alone the fact that simply phrasing a question in one way versus another changes the outcome of the study, sometimes fairly dramatically.

 

http://www.salon.com/2017/09/03/this-is-your-developing-brain-on-white-supremacy/#.Way4AsUE9u8.facebook As I have noted previously, the techniques are similar to the ones ISIS uses for the same reasons.

via An article on brain development and white supremacy — facingthefireswithin